New York Ripper Dutch Lobby Cards

Blue Underground’s excellent 4K restoration of The New York Ripper is a fine opportunity to delve into one of the movie’s rarest memorabilia.

Lucio Fulci’s bleak New York City-based 1982 giallo does not have the fan following, of say, George Romero’s Dawn of the Dead or the Star Wars series and the number of memorabilia or new merchandise associated with the movie is rather limited.

There are known to be three Western European sets of lobby cards: German, French, and Italian. There are 16 French lobby cards and 6 Italian photobustas. The German set of lobby cards is the most sought-after as this set consists of 24 lobby cards. Owning the most complete set, however, does not make the others redundant because each features images that are not included in the German set. The Italian photobustas also have a different design and show two images on each lobby card.

Unbeknownst to most giallo and Fulci fanatics, there exists a set of 30 (!) Dutch lobby cards. The Dutch lobby cards are authentic and were made available by the now-bankrupt Dutch film distribution company Concorde Film from Den Haag for the release of the movie.

What is interesting about the New York Ripper lobby cards is that many of them show much wider shots or different angles than seen in the movie. Even more intriguing are the lobby cards that feature set photos, or even takes that were not used in the movie, such as Faye walking around the Prospect Theater area, or Jane wearing a tweed jacket with leather elbows while conversing with her husband. The lobby cards also feature subtle clues about New York locations that are hard to infer from watching the movie.

Sutton Square in The New York Ripper

One of the more intriguing shots in Lucio Fulci’s The New York Ripper involves the residence of nymphomaniac Jane Lodge and her husband. A close examination of this scene reveals the distinctive features of the Queensboro Bridge before zooming in on their house. The conjunction of the Queensboro Bridge and the grandeur of their home leave little doubt that their mansion is located in the Sutton Place neighborhood.

7 Sutton Square as seen in Lucio Fulci’s The New York Ripper (1982)

Their home at the end of E 58th street, 7 Sutton Square, formerly known as 1 Riverview Terrace, has a long and fascinating history. Unlike many other cities, the New York City waterfront was traditionally not considered a desirable place to live for wealthy people. During the 20th century, however, the neighborhood known as Sutton Place increasingly became an attractive and secluded place to reside. The residences on Riverview Terrace even enjoy a private, gated, waterfront park.

If one would go out and search for the building with its distinctive white brick and lemon shutters that is seen in The New York Ripper, one would have a hard time locating it since the house was restored back to its original red brick colors. Also missing today are the two sea creatures (modeled after the gates within the Giardino di Boboli in Florence, Italy) that sat on top of the entry gates to Riverview Terrace.

7 Sutton Square in June, 2019. Photo by Niyati Shah

The choice of 7 Sutton Square as the couple’s residence in The New York Ripper is suggestive because the decayed and corroded sights of the Queensboro bridge behind it draw attention to the neglected and dangerous New York City that is so prominently featured in Fulci’s American giallo classic.

The Sutton Place neighborhood is no stranger to murder mysteries, as evidenced by the cover of Robert George Dean’s “The Sutton Place Murders”, a novel published in 1936.

The Twin Towers in The New York Ripper

The old World Trade Center is a staple in many 1970s and 1980s grindhouse classics such as “I Spit on Your Grave”, “Zombie”, “The House on the Edge of the Park”, and “Cannibal Holocaust.” A close viewing of Lucio Fulci’s “The New York Ripper” reveals four distinct scenes in which the Twin Tower are seen.

In the Brooklyn opening scene of the movie the Twin Towers are briefly visible when the camera pans to show Manhattan.

The second time we see the Twin Towers is during the scene where the young woman boards the Staten Island Ferry. What is intriguing about this scene is that the towers cannot only be seen just after the departure of the ferry, but there is also a quick cut to the towers during the murder scene in the car.

The Twin Towers can also be seen in this German New York Ripper lobby card below but, to my knowledge, this shot is not an actual shot from the movie and must be a production photo or unused footage.


The next time we see the World Trade Center is when the NYC police deploys a helicopter to assist in tracking down the location of the murderer’s phone calls.

Not long after this scene, the World Trade Center is visible on several occasions when Lieutenant Williams arrives at the location where the calls were made but….

De Slachter van New York

In Belgium, Lucio Fulci’s New York Ripper was released as “De Doder van New York” as evidenced by the cover of the VHS tape below (a promotional poster also exists). Multiple sources state that the movie was released in the Netherlands as “De Slachter van New York” but so far I have not seen any evidence of this online;┬áno videocassette covers, no poster or other promotional materials, and a web search produces only a handful of items that do not reveal any more information.

De Doder van New York
This short review (or more aptly, a description) of the New York Ripper in the Dutch newspaper Leidsch Dagblad of December 16, 1983 does use the name “De Slachter van New York” but whether the author refers to the title of the Dutch release is ambiguous.

De Slachter van New York Leidsch Dagblad Dec16 1983

Further complicating matters is this rare, poorly designed, bilingual, poster from Belgium that features “De Ripper van New York” as the title.

new-york-ripper-belgie